Crisis

Where ever you live, you can contact the Samaritans on: 116 123

Need to talk?

Wherever you live, you can contact the Samaritans on: 116 123

What to do in a Crisis

What is a crisis? Crisis can mean different things to different people. When we use the term crisis we mean overwhelming thoughts and/or feelings to either hurt yourself, hurt somebody else or you are planning or attempting suicide.

Depending on how severe the situation is for you (or someone you care for) will decide on who it is best to contact. The key aim is to get to the right help at the right time that supports you to deal with the situation as safely and as calmly as possible.  There is no step by step approach to accessing crisis support, each situation is as unique as the individual experiencing a crisis.  The severity of the impact upon the person will determine which organisation or service listed below you contact.

Please click on the image below to enlarge!
Crisis Pathway

 

Support for the under 18s

Having thoughts about wanting to die and suicide are painful and can effect anyone of us. The Young People’s Pathway identifies the steps that can be taken to access support. It has been created for young people up to the age of 18, and it explains clearly the support that is available. There is no step by step approach to accessing crisis support, each situation is as unique as the individual experiencing a crisis. If you are worried about a young person, or worried about your own thoughts , please tell someone who you can trust, or contact any of the numbers from the Pathway.

Please click on the image below to enlarge!

YPcrisispathway 2016 national

What is suicide?

Most people contemplating suicide may not want to die; they want to stop the pain and distress they are experiencing:

Talking about suicide saves lives
If you are worried about someone talk to them, it could save their life
If you feel suicidal, don’t hide it, talk to someone you trust or phone a local service or helpline
Suicide affects all ages, genders and cultures

How can I help someone?

If you are worried about a friend, colleague, neighbour or family member they may really appreciate you asking how they are. You don’t have to be able to solve their problem, or even to completely understand it, but listening to what they have to say will at least let them know you care.

Possible signs that someone you know may be at risk of suicide:

If they have made a previous suicide attempt.

If they talk about ‘not wanting to go on’, ‘ending it al’l, ‘not wanting to wake up’ or  ‘wanting to die’

If they can’t see a way out of their current crisis / distress / situation.

If they have been through stressful life events or have experienced a trauma or significant loss and don’t seem to be coping.

If they are drinking, smoking or using drugs more than usual.

If they have started putting things in order, e.g. sorting life insurance, wills, pet care or childcare or giving away their belongings

If they show noticeable changes in behaviour, appearance or mood; (distracted, sad, distant, not taking care of themselves) or a sudden uplift in mood following a period of depression.